Efforts to secure systems and data from a cyberattack often focus on measures such as multifactor authentication (MFA), endpoint monitoring solutions, antivirus protections, and role-based access management controls, and for good reason. But there is a basic principle of data protection that when applied across an organization can significantly reduce the impact of a data

The use of smart dashcams and vehicle cameras, including those leveraging AI technology, may trigger the next wave of BIPA litigation, according to two cases filed in Illinois this week.

Enacted in 2008, the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act, 740 ILCS 14 et seq. (the “BIPA”), went largely unnoticed until a few years ago

The leaders of our Wage & Hour Practice, Justin Barnes Jeffrey Brecher and Eric Magnus collaborated with us on this article.

According to reports, Kronos, the cloud-based, HR management service provider, suffered a data incident involving ransomware affecting its information systems. Kronos communicated that it discovered the incident late on Saturday, December 11, 2021,

With health-related data and how to protect it at the forefront of discussion since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, this week California Governor Gavin Newsom signed into law two bills related to genetic data.  First, AB 825, will expand the definition of personal information to include genetic data, for data breach notification requirements

On September 17, 2021, a three-judge panel of the Illinois Appellate Court for the First Judicial District issued a long-awaited decision regarding the statute of limitations for claims under the state’s Biometric Information Privacy Act (“BIPA”) in Tims v. Black Horse Carriers, Inc. The Tims decision marks the first appellate guidance regarding this issue.  Although

Yesterday, Baltimore’s local ordinance prohibiting persons from “obtaining, retaining, accessing, or using certain face surveillance technology or any information obtained from certain face surveillance technology,” became effective.  The new ordinance prohibits the use of facial recognition technology by city residents, businesses, and most of the city government (excluding the city police department) until December 2022.

Facial recognition technology has become increasingly popular in recent years in the employment and consumer space (e.g. employee access, passport check-in systems, payments on smartphones), and in particular during the COVID-19 pandemic. As the need arose to screen persons entering a facility for symptoms of the virus, including temperature, thermal cameras, kiosks, and other devices

The Baltimore City Council recently passed an ordinance, in a vote of 13-2, barring the use of facial recognition technology by city residents, businesses, and most of the city government (excluding the city police department) until December 2022.  Council Bill 21-0001  prohibits persons from “obtaining, retaining, accessing, or using certain face surveillance technology or any

As we noted in our last post, there has been a flurry of data privacy and security activity in New York, with the State appearing poised to join California as a leader in this space.  Most recently, on April 29, 2021, the New York City Council passed the Tenant Data Privacy Act (“TDPA”), which

Effective July 9, 2021, certain retail and hospitality businesses that collect and use “biometric identifier information” from customers will need to post conspicuous notices near all customer entrances to their facilities.  These businesses will also be barred from selling, leasing, trading, sharing or otherwise profiting from the biometric identifier information they collect from customers.  Customers