Earlier this month, New York Governor Kathy Hochul signed into a law a bill that will require New York private sector employers to provide written notice to employees before engaging in electronic monitoring of their activities in the workplace.  Civil Rights (CVR) Chapter 6, Article 5, Section 52-C*2 will take effect six months after enactment,

Last week, the Department of Justice (“DOJ”) announced the launch of its Civil Cyber-Fraud Initiative (“the Initiative”) aimed at combating “new and emerging cyber threats to the security of sensitive information and critical systems” specifically targeting accountability of cybersecurity obligations for federal contractors and federal grant recipients, by way of the False Claims Act.  The

With health-related data and how to protect it at the forefront of discussion since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, this week California Governor Gavin Newsom signed into law two bills related to genetic data.  First, AB 825, will expand the definition of personal information to include genetic data, for data breach notification requirements

The Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) recently issued an important policy statement to health apps and other connected devices that collect or use consumers’ health information.  The FTC’s policy statement effectively clarified the position that health apps and related connected devices are subject to the Health Breach Notification Rule (“the Rule”), which requires vendors of personal

On September 17, 2021, a three-judge panel of the Illinois Appellate Court for the First Judicial District issued a long-awaited decision regarding the statute of limitations for claims under the state’s Biometric Information Privacy Act (“BIPA”) in Tims v. Black Horse Carriers, Inc. The Tims decision marks the first appellate guidance regarding this issue.  Although

Yesterday, Baltimore’s local ordinance prohibiting persons from “obtaining, retaining, accessing, or using certain face surveillance technology or any information obtained from certain face surveillance technology,” became effective.  The new ordinance prohibits the use of facial recognition technology by city residents, businesses, and most of the city government (excluding the city police department) until December 2022.

Watch out! A spike in ransomware attacks may be headed our way over Labor Day weekend. Yesterday, the FBI jointly with the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) issued a warning to be on high alert for ransomware attacks this weekend, after recent targeted attacks over Mother’s Day, Memorial Day and Fourth of July weekends.

Facial recognition technology has become increasingly popular in recent years in the employment and consumer space (e.g. employee access, passport check-in systems, payments on smartphones), and in particular during the COVID-19 pandemic. As the need arose to screen persons entering a facility for symptoms of the virus, including temperature, thermal cameras, kiosks, and other devices

The Baltimore City Council recently passed an ordinance, in a vote of 13-2, barring the use of facial recognition technology by city residents, businesses, and most of the city government (excluding the city police department) until December 2022.  Council Bill 21-0001  prohibits persons from “obtaining, retaining, accessing, or using certain face surveillance technology or any