Coronaviruses 004 lores.jpgThe outbreak of a new coronavirus that is believed to have began in central Chinese city of Wuhan and now appears to be spreading to the United States is driving concerns for organizations around preparedness regarding their operations, their customers, and their employees. Both the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the State

Can we prohibit employees from making audio recordings at work?  As advancements in technology continue to increase, and it becomes easier and easier for employees to surreptitiously record conversations, this inquiry is posed by many employers.  In fact, we discussed this very question back in 2013.  Unfortunately, the answer to this question is perhaps the

As discussed in an earlier post, shortly after the United States Postal Service reported a data breach potentially affecting hundreds of thousands of  employees, the American Postal Workers Union filed an unfair labor practice with the National Labor Relations Board alleging the Postal Service should have bargained with the union over the impact and

We reported earlier that the National Labor Relations Board had been considering changing its previous position that  “employees have no statutory right to use the[ir] Employer’s e-mail system for Section 7 purposes.”  The NLRB’s position in this regard was established in 2007, under the NLRB’s ruling in Register Guard.  Today, in Purple Communications Inc.

After being hit with a data breach, the last thing a company might want is the scrutiny of the union representing its employees affected by the incident. When the data breach potentially affecting hundreds of thousands of United States Postal Service employees was reported, it was not long after that the American Postal Workers

The National Labor Relations Board has found that another employer (a non-union employer) violated its employees’ protected concerted activity rights under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) when it disciplined and fired them for certain social media activity. Our Labor Group provides an extensive analysis of this decision in Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille

The National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) continues to be active in its review of employer social media policies. In recent years, the NLRB’s review of social media policies has focused largely on whether an employee would reasonably construe the language of the policy as prohibiting him or her from engaging in activity protected by Section

If you are a public sector employer, you may be particularly interested in an article written by my fellow shareholder and practice group member, Marlo Johnson Roebuck. She writes about a recent case, Graziosi v. City of Greenville, involving a police department’s decision to terminate a police officer for statements she made on

Today, the NLRB‘s Acting General Counsel posted a third report regarding social media issues which have been brought to the agency. The cases discussed in this report should provide further guidance to employers struggling with developing strategies for using social media in their business, developing employee policies regulating activity in social media, and enforcing those