Tag Archives: Supreme Court

Eleventh Circuit rejects incentive awards for class plaintiffs

Co-Author: Eric R. Magnus The Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals recently ruled that “incentive” or “service” awards to lead plaintiffs in Rule 23 class actions are unlawful. It is the first circuit court of appeals to expressly invalidate such awards as a matter of law. (Johnson v. NPAS Solutions, LLC, No. 18-12344, September 17, 2020). … Continue Reading

Will the Passing of Justice Ginsburg Impact the Future of the TCPA?

The passing of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will likely bring with it many shifts in the Court on key issues, among which are matters regarding the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA), most imminently –  what qualifies as an auto dialer. The TCPA has been ever evolving in recent years as courts and … Continue Reading

U.S. Supreme Court Will Finally Weigh in on Scope of CFAA

The United States Supreme Court recently granted a petition for certiorari in Van Buren v. United States addressing the issue of whether it is a violation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (“CFAA”) when an individual who is authorized to access information on a computer, accesses the same information for an improper purpose. The … Continue Reading

The Supreme Court and the Future of the TCPA

In a decision that may have significant impact on businesses that face Telephone Consumer Protect Act (“TCPA”) related class action litigation, the Supreme Court recently accepted certiorari of a petition to rule on the constitutionality of the TCPA. The Court agreed to review a ruling of the Fourth Circuit which held that a TCPA exemption … Continue Reading

U.S. Supreme Court Leaves Open the Issue of FCC Interpretation of TCPA, For Now

The U.S. Supreme Court issued its long awaited decision in PDR Network LLC v. Carlton, addressing the issue of whether the Hobbs Act requires the district court to accept the 2006 Federal Communication Commission (FCC) Order 2006 (“the Order”), which provides the legal interpretation for the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA). Unfortunately, the Court did not answer the question presented when … Continue Reading

Supreme Court Rules on Employee Data Breach Class Arbitration Suit

In June of 2018 we reported that the U.S. Supreme Court granted a petition for review of a data breach lawsuit addressing the issue of whether parties can pursue class arbitration when the language in the arbitration agreement does not explicitly allow for such, Lamps Plus, Inc. v. Varela , No. 17-988, certiorari granted April 30, 2018. … Continue Reading

Actual Harm Not Required to Sue Under Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Law

Earlier today, the Illinois Supreme Court handed down a significant decision concerning the ability of individuals to bring suit under the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA). In short, individuals need not allege actual injury or adverse effect, beyond a violation of his/her rights under BIPA, in order to qualify as an “aggrieved” person and be entitled to … Continue Reading

The U.S. Supreme Court Will Rule on FCC Interpretation of the TCPA

Late last year, the U.S. Supreme Court granted certiorari in PDR Network, LLC v. Carlton & Harris Chiropractic (No. 17-1705), addressing the issue of whether the Hobbs Act requires the district court to accept the Federal Communication Commission’s (FCC’s) legal interpretation of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA). In 1991, Congress passed the TCPA to … Continue Reading

You’re Gonna Need a Warrant for That….

On June 22, 2018, in Carpenter v. United States, the United States Supreme Court decided that the federal government would need a warrant in order to obtain historical location data from cellular service providers, based on cell tower “pings.” (“Pings” are more formally referred to as cell-site location information or “CLSI.”) As explained in more … Continue Reading

The Supreme Court Will Rule on Data Breach Class Arbitration Suit

The U.S. Supreme Court recently granted a petition for review of a data breach lawsuit addressing the issue of whether parties can pursue a class arbitration when the language in the arbitration agreement does not explicitly allow for such, Lamps Plus, Inc. v. Varela , No. 17-988, certiorari granted April 30, 2018. The Court will have the … Continue Reading

The U.S. Supreme Court Dismisses U.S. v. Microsoft Following Passage of the CLOUD Act

On April 17th, the U.S. Supreme Court dismissed the highly anticipated U.S. v. Microsoft, ruling that recently enacted legislation rendered the case moot. Microsoft Corp. had been in litigation with the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) for several years over the issue of whether Microsoft must comply with a U.S. search warrant for access to … Continue Reading

Supreme Court Will Not Hear Ninth Circuit Decision Regarding Willful Violations of FCRA’s Disclosure Provision

On November 13, 2017, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear the appeal of one of 2017’s more significant Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) opinions, Syed v. M-I, LLC. (9th Cir. Jan. 20, 2017).  In Syed, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals held that a background check disclosure which included a liability waiver violated the … Continue Reading

SCOTUS Will Not Review CFAA Password Sharing Case

The United State Supreme Court recently denied certiorari in Nosal v. United States, 16-1344, declining to weigh in on the scope of unauthorized access under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (“CFAA”). The Ninth Circuit held in Nosal that David Nosal violated the CFAA by using his past assistant’s password to access his former employer’s … Continue Reading

Update: Case Involving Sharing of Passwords May Be Headed to the Supreme Court

Last August, we reported on a Ninth Circuit case in which a former employee was convicted of a crime under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (“CFAA”) for accessing and downloading information from his former company’s database “without authorization.”  The former employee has now asked that the U.S. Supreme review the Ninth Circuit’s decision. The … Continue Reading

6 Best Practices For Avoiding TCPA Violations As The Scope Of Liability Under The Statute Swells

As we have previously discussed, the Federal Communications Commission (the “FCC”) recently issued a Declaratory Ruling (“Declaratory Ruling”) that, among other things, likely exposes companies to even greater liability under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (the “TCPA”). The TCPA regulates communications, from companies to their consumers, that utilize an automatic telephone dialing system (“ATDS”).  Under the … Continue Reading

Supreme Court to Examine Standing Under FCRA

The U.S. Supreme Court recently decided to hear a case brought under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (“FCRA”) to determine whether individual consumers have standing to sue a consumer reporting agency for statutory violations of the FCRA when no “actual damages” were suffered by the consumer. The FCRA, like other privacy laws, imposes monetary damages … Continue Reading

HIPAA Privacy Rule Also Affected By Supreme Court’s DOMA Decision in U.S. v. Windsor

When the U.S. Supreme Court decided United States v. Windsor, it declared section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) to be unconstitutional. For many companies, the decision meant changes to certain of their employee benefit plans, as well as the tax treatment of employee contributions for same sex spouses. However, declaring section 3 of … Continue Reading

Missouri Constitutional Amendment Protects Electronic Privacy

On August 5, 2014, Missouri voters approved Amendment 9 to the Missouri Constitution making Missouri the first state in the nation to offer explicit constitutional protection to electronic communications and data from unreasonable serches and seizures. The official ballot title asked:  “Shall the Missouri Constitution be amended so that the people shall be secure in their … Continue Reading

Supreme Court Decision in Riley Affects Cellphone Searches in Civil Litigation, Employment Matters

When the United States Supreme Court handed down its decision Riley v. California, a Fourth Amendment criminal case, we suspected it would not be long before the rationale in that case concerning the privacy interests individuals have in cellphones would be more broadly applied. In late June, a federal district court in Connecticut denied a request  by two … Continue Reading
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