The California Consumer Privacy Act takes effect January 1, 2020. Businesses within the scope of the CCPA are taking steps to prepare, including drafting notices to inform California consumers of their right to opt out of the sale of their personal information. However, California will not be the first state to provide a consumer with

The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), which goes into effect January 1, 2020, is considered the most robust state privacy law in the United States. The CCPA seems to have spurred a flood of similar legislative proposals on the state level, and started a shift in the consumer privacy law landscape. Many of these proposals

When businesses set out to safeguard “personal information,” a fundamental consideration is what that term means. Likewise, when negotiating a third-party vendor agreement, it typically is not enough to rely on the standard definition for “confidential information.” Recently, Nevada and other states have updated their definitions of personal information in connection data breaches notification and

A new law in New York (eff. April 1, 2011) and a flurry of bills across the country (New Jersey, Nevada, Florida, Connecticut and Oregon) are aimed at requiring businesses to deal with their electronic waste in one form or another. Before discarding that old laptop, businesses should make sure they do so securely and in accordance with applicable state law.
Continue Reading Wondering What To Do With Your “Electronic Waste”?

Data privacy and security laws in states such as Massachusetts, Maryland and Nevada require businesses to develop written policies and procedures that provide administrative, physical, and technological safeguards to protect personal information – or a "written information security program" or "WISP." These laws do not require protections for confidential company information and trade secrets, but