Tag Archives: litigation

SCOTUS Will Not Review CFAA Password Sharing Case

The United State Supreme Court recently denied certiorari in Nosal v. United States, 16-1344, declining to weigh in on the scope of unauthorized access under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (“CFAA”). The Ninth Circuit held in Nosal that David Nosal violated the CFAA by using his past assistant’s password to access his former employer’s … Continue Reading

2-Year Statute of Limitations Applies to HIV Patient’s Privacy Suit

A New Jersey appeals court recently ruled that a two-year statute of limitations applies to a claim by an HIV-positive patient asserting one of his doctors improperly disclosed his medical status to a third party without consent.  The three-judge Appellate Division panel rejected arguments by the doctor that the suit should be dismissed as time-barred … Continue Reading

Employers Beware of Phishing Scams

On April 20, 2016, a class action lawsuit was filed in the United States District Court, Southern District of California against Sprouts Farmers Market, Inc. The lawsuit was initiated by a former employee whose W-2 was allegedly disclosed as part of a phishing scam that occurred in late March 2016 amid reports that Sprouts’ employees … Continue Reading

Motion to Deny Class Certification Under TCPA Granted

The U.S. District Court for the Southern District of California recently granted Wilshire Consumer Capital’s (WCC) motion to deny class certification in a putative class action filed under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA). The named plaintiff, Alu Banarji, filed suit after receiving numerous telephone calls on her cell phone.  According to the Court, Ms. Banarji’s … Continue Reading

No Statutory Damages Under SCA Without Actual Damages

The U.S. Court Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit has ruled that statutory damages under the Stored Communications Act (SCA) are not available in a case where the plaintiff did not incur any actual damages. The case, Vista Marketing LLC v. Burkett, originated from an extremely contentious divorce proceeding.  While the majority of the  allegations in that … Continue Reading

Top 10 for 2016 – Happy Data Privacy Day

In honor of Data Privacy Day, we provide the following “Top 10 for 2016.”  While the list is by no means exhaustive, it does provide some hot topics for organizations to consider in 2016. EU/U.S. Data Transfer (status of Safe Harbor).  On October 6, 2015, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) ruled … Continue Reading

Attempt to Unmask Online Reviewer Denied

You’ve spent extensive time and effort, not to mention money, establishing your company’s reputation only to have the company defamed or disparaged anonymously online. This is a scenario which many organizations face in today’s virtual marketplace. As a recent decision by the Delaware Superior Court illustrates, dealing with these types of issues is often difficult … Continue Reading

California District Court – “Under TCPA Autodialer Must Generate Numbers”

One of the most complex issues under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) is determining whether the technology utilized qualifies as an “automatic telephone dialing system” (ATDS) or “autodialer.”  The TCPA prohibits using an ATDS to make calls to cell phone numbers, absent prior consent of the called party.  An ATDS  is generally define as … Continue Reading

*UPDATE* Suit Against School District Regarding Tweet Settles

As previously reported, in a March 2014 filing titled H.W. v. Sterling High School District, a New Jersey high school student filed suit claiming school officials had violated her constitutional rights when they punished her for content she posted on Twitter which criticized Sterling High School’s principal. The settlement, which was approved by the Sterling … Continue Reading

Fulbright’s Litigation Survey Addresses Privacy in the Age of Social Media and Mobile Devices

Norton Rose Fulbright recently released the results of their 9th annual litigation trends survey.  The Fulbright survey reflects information collected from 392 in-house attorneys; including 82% identifying themselves as general counsel and 14% as head of litigation. Additionally, the companies responding to the survey represent virtually all industries, include entities of all sizes, and are almost evenly split … Continue Reading

Student Files Suit After Tweet Lands Her In Hot Water

A New Jersey student has filed a federal court lawsuit, H.W. v. Sterling High School District, alleging that she has been subject to disability discrimination and that her First Amendment rights have been violated. The student, known only as H.W. in court papers, was banned from the prom, senior trip, and the school’s commencement ceremony following … Continue Reading

Facebook Posts Not Discoverable

The Florida District Court of Appeal, Second District quashed an order requiring the mother of a vehicle accident victim to produce copies of certain postings on her Facebook account.  In Root v. Balfour Beatty Constr., LLC, the plaintiff, Tonia Root (“plaintiff”) filed a negligence suit against the city and its contractors following an accident where her … Continue Reading

Top 14 for 2014

In honor of National Data Privacy Day, we provide the following “Top 14 for 2014.”  While the list is by no means exhaustive, it does provide critical areas businesses will need to consider in 2014. Location Based Tracking.  As the utilization of GPS enable devices becomes more and more prevalent, employers are often faced with … Continue Reading

Class Action Alleging Improper Viewing of Driver’s License Information Dismissed as to Minnesota State Officials

The Driver’s Privacy Protection Act ("DPPA"), 18 U.S.C. Section 2721, et seq, was enacted by Congress in 1994 after the highly-publicized murder of actress Rebecca Schaeffer by a stalker who obtained her unlisted address from the California Department of Motor Vehicles. ("DMV").  The Act restricts state DMVs from disclosing personal information contained in motor vehicle records except … Continue Reading

“Liking” A Facebook Page Is Not Protected By The First Amendment

A Virginia district court recently held that an employee’s clicking of the Facebook “like” button is not comparable to speech. Accordingly, the court affirmed the dismissal of First Amendment retaliation claims brought by employees of a Virginia sheriff’s office finding that the employees’ action was insufficient to merit constitutional protection. Sheriff B.J. Roberts of the Hampton, Virginia … Continue Reading

Alleged HIPAA Violation Supports State Common Law Negligence Claim

A Missouri federal district court has ruled, in I.S. v. Washington University, that a HIPAA-covered entity’s disclosure of protected information can form the basis for a state-law negligence claim.  The Court reached this holding despite the well-accepted principle there is no private cause of action under HIPAA.  The plaintiff, I.S., was undergoing medical treatment for … Continue Reading

Addressing Social Media Use–Recent Ruling on Students’ Social Networking Reaffirms Need for Policies and Training

The pervasiveness of social media in professional and everyday communication is a hot button issue (discussed at length here), particularly for private and public employers and organizations.  In fact, many organizations have adopted, or are considering adopting, social media policies for employees and providing training for how employees should interact in cyberspace.  But what should … Continue Reading

“Tagged” Facebook Photos Admissible as Evidence

Trying to keep up with the fast-moving world of social media, the Kentucky Court of Appeals has ruled that “tagged” or captioned photographs posted on Facebook may be admitted as evidence. The ruling in the case has implications for employers.  In LaLonde v. LaLonde, the appellant-wife objected to the trial court’s admitting into evidence photographs taken … Continue Reading

U.S. Bank Hit with Class Action Suit Alleging Data Breach Cover-Up

Paintball Punks filed a class action suit against U.S. Bank  in Hennepin County, Minnesota. The case was subsequently removed on December 6, 2010, to the Minneapolis District Court. In the complaint, Paintball Punks alleges that between August and December 2009 it received 9 orders totaling approximately $11,000, which were fraudulently billed to U.S. Bank-issued cards. The amount was subsequently … Continue Reading
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