Search Results for: CFAA

U.S. Supreme Court Will Finally Weigh in on Scope of CFAA

The United States Supreme Court recently granted a petition for certiorari in Van Buren v. United States addressing the issue of whether it is a violation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (“CFAA”) when an individual who is authorized to access information on a computer, accesses the same information for an improper purpose. The … Continue Reading

District Court Finds no CFAA Violation where Employee Shares Confidential Company Information with Competitor

A district court in Tennessee recently concluded in Wachter Inc. v. Cabling Innovations LLC that two former employees who allegedly shared confidential company information found on the company’s computer system with a competitor did not violate the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA). The CFAA expressly prohibits “intentionally accessing a computer without authorization or exceeding … Continue Reading

SCOTUS Will Not Review CFAA Password Sharing Case

The United State Supreme Court recently denied certiorari in Nosal v. United States, 16-1344, declining to weigh in on the scope of unauthorized access under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (“CFAA”). The Ninth Circuit held in Nosal that David Nosal violated the CFAA by using his past assistant’s password to access his former employer’s … Continue Reading

Lawful Access and Improper Use of Computer Data Does Not Violate the CFAA

The Fourth Circuit recently held that the Consumer Fraud and Abuse Act’s (“CFAA”) prohibitions against unauthorized access or access in excess of authorization were not violated by an employee when the employee used his valid access to employer’s computer network to download confidential business information that he later used while working for a competitor. Prior … Continue Reading

Update: Ninth Circuit to Rehear CFAA Case

As previously discussed, the federal appeals court in San Francisco had reinstated an indictment charging a former employee of Korn/Ferry International, Inc., with violations of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, 18 U.S.C. § 1030 (the “CFAA”) for trying to start a business that would compete with his former employer. Now, however, at the urging … Continue Reading

Restitution Includes Credit Monitoring Costs Following Data Breach Under CFAA

A recent criminal case involving a government employer harmed by a computer hacking incident affecting its personnel records may provide support for companies seeking to recover the costs they incur when taking appropriate steps to investigate these data incidents and mitigate harm when a breach is found to have occurred.… Continue Reading

Update: Case Involving Sharing of Passwords May Be Headed to the Supreme Court

Last August, we reported on a Ninth Circuit case in which a former employee was convicted of a crime under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (“CFAA”) for accessing and downloading information from his former company’s database “without authorization.”  The former employee has now asked that the U.S. Supreme review the Ninth Circuit’s decision. The … Continue Reading

Eleventh Circuit Upholds Company Claims Against Former Executive For Unlawful Access to Email

A terminated executive who accessed co-worker emails in the process of reporting possible company wrongdoing lost his appeal on several grounds. In Brown Jordan Intl, Inc. v. Carmicle, the Eleventh Circuit found that the employee violated both the Stored Communications Act (SCA) and the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA). Carmicle reported to the company … Continue Reading

Sharing of Passwords Under Certain Circumstances Unlawful

Many companies have experienced the departure of an employee and the elimination of that former employees access to the company’s computers and networks. In the recent case of USA v. Nosal, D.C. No. 3:08-cr-00237-EMC-1 (July 5, 2016), the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals was presented with the following facts:  Nosal, a former employee of Korn/Ferry … Continue Reading

North Carolina Employees are not “Authorized” to Divert Employer Data

As the year draws to a close, employer claims under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (“CFAA”) against departing employees for stealing or otherwise diverting employer information without authorization to do so are dying slow deaths in many federal courts across the nation. As noted over on the Non-Compete and Trade Secrets Report, the U.S. … Continue Reading

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